Thursday, May 30, 2013

Completely New and Original

I don’t believe there is an artist anywhere, no matter what media calls their spirit who sets out to create something hackneyed, trite and clich├ęd.

Sure we’ve heard a thousand times, “There’s nothing new under the sun,” “There aren’t any new ideas, just new ways to see old ideas,” or “If it’s that original, you just didn’t do enough research.”

Writers are particularly subjected to this sort of thing and for writers there is a caveat, if it truly is original, you’ll never get it published. Why? I’m glad you asked, because the marketing department of the publishing house has no way to flack it!

Yeah, I know, commercialism, but that’s the sad part, if they can’t find a way to hook it into a market or define who will read it, they won’t bite. Imagine that, publishers want to make a buck and they will not spend money on something they think won’t generate a revenue stream.

Now visual artist have it a bit easier, they can get away with more for a coupla reasons. The first is if it is completely original it has a better chance of catching and holding the eye and that is a very good thing cause if they ain’t looking they ain’t buying. And second, change and innovation are the bread and butter of the visual art world. No one ever said Picasso was speaking for the Great American Public, and Alexander Calder was not what most people had in mind when they went looking for a piece to give to Aunt Minnie for her eighty-second birthday and they had to hurry cause she was due back from her hang gliding, base-jumping holiday in Tunisia any day now.

But because they were so strikingly different and new they caught and held the critic’s eye long enough for the public to catch up.

Okay so Picasso is still a bit out of the realm for most people, but I have to admit along with Loni Anderson’s bikini poster I had a print of Picasso’s Guernica in my dorm room. And I love his blue period, his blue period self-portrait and blue nude are among my all-time favorites for any kind of art. So that’s the disclaimer, any comments about Picasso can be dismissed as completely not so unbiased.

So when you set out to find your subject, that task we all face because if we stop there’s no telling if we’d ever start again, what with all of the minutia of life insisting we devote all of our attention and all of our free time and all of our not free time to it and then there are the kids and the dog and the thing on the couch which doesn’t even show signs of life anymore except for the death grip on the remote and the light bill and the nice folks at the church/ club/swinger’s mixed doubles swapping party, so if you ever stopped you’d never get up the energy to start again cause it is only the inertia of all that motion you’ve invested for the last forty years since you left the sheltered halls of ivy and ventured out into the world to make your fortune only you didn’t and then all sorts of things got in the way.

So when you find your subject is it new, completely original and the neatest thing since indoor plumbing or did you just make another one of the things which you have been doing for the last humpty-hump years since you walked away form college and decided to be a grown up?

Relax. If it isn’t, there’s no need to panic.

In fact you may just have hit on the right track without thinking about it so enjoy, give yourself a pat on the back and keep right on doing what you are doing.

What not keep striving for originality? Madness, sloth, and the sure sign of the crumbling of Western Civilization!

Blather!

There are folks out there, people with money, the kind you like, who will buy art who don’t much care for originality. They like stuff which they can identify and understand right now, today, without the Cliff Notes.

Television is a ravenous creature; it eats up material at a pace which would make the most frenzied Tasmanian Devil gasp for breath. Every new season and now mid-season and summer season they have to roll out new programs and they all want to be the most inventive, original and dazzling programs we’ve ever seen. Like Survivor and Duck Dynasty and The Real Housewives of Upper Slobovia.

And do we line up and watch? Not likely, not if the ratings are even a little bit correct. According to the folks who keep score on who’s watching what, when and for why, the ratings champ is CBS.

Imagine that? They don’t have all of those new and original and dazzling shows, what they have is scripted programs with a storyline, plot and actors. Other networks have winning shows, CBS has a winning network.

And if you think that only works for broadcast television where they can't say words and show nekkid folks doing all manner of things which your parents assured you’d go blind if you did you’d be wrong again. USA tops the cable ratings with a schedule; of wait…hold your breath…don’t give it away…scripted programs with a storyline, plot and actors.

Seems there are a lot of folks who just want to settle in after a day’s work and spend some quality time with people they know and like who have lives a lot more troubled than their own and don’t have to listen to someone begging the car keys or wanting more money or playing music at a level which can be heard in outer space. 

And yes, I have to admit I am guilty too. I’d rather spend an hour with Gibbs or Castle and know pretty much what I am going to get than to watch something more trendy or innovative and be so confused that I don’t know what I’ve seen when it is over.

And that artists pals of mine is the whole point, whatever you are doing, be it cutting edge, brilliant, creative genius or just decorative, it’s all good. That’s right there are folks out there who will want to see what you have done and they will buy what you have done and they won’t give a thought to how much blood and sweat you poured into coming up with it.

Which is why you should spent a lot more time working and a lot less time thinking about what your work will mean and what sort of legacy it will generate and what roll it will play in the cultural treasure for future generations.

Screw’em let them make up stuff about it after you are dead!


SWOCC Student Art Show

SWOCC Annual student art show


Thursday May 30, 2013

Time: 4:00 - 6:30

Gallery Reception

Eden Hall Gallery

This is the all art departments show.

It is open through June 7, 2013.



Expressions West Opening

Expressions West 2013

Opens Friday, May 31st, with a reception from 5:00 - 7:00

It is a wonderfully, colorful exhibition of sixty-nine works by fifty-four artists for seven western states.

The juror, John Hewitt, has a one person exhibition in the Mabel Hansen Gallery.

Dusanka Kralj will present One World Mind, Transcending Boundaries in the Uno E Richter Atrium Atrium Gallery.

And

Works by the Advanced Watercolor Workshop at Coos Art Museum with be displayed in the Clare Wehrle Community Gallery.

All of these exhibitions run from May 31st to July 27th.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

From Charles of Charleston

Hi Everyone


This workshop has been CANCELED.



Plein-Air Painting with emphasis on Golden Rectangle.

Cynthia Herron

Saturday, June 1, 10am-3pm

Use any painting media.

$30.00 per person.



The Many Colored Land

Color is all around us, here in Oregon it comes in so many shades and variations it is impossible not to think of color when you sit down to work.

But are you doing yourself and your art the best favor?

There is a lot to be said for monochrome work. Some of the greatest painters had whole periods where they worked in one color. Picasso is probably the most widely known principally because his “Blue” and “Rose” periods predate his experiments with Cubism and for many non critics are more understandable and acceptable than his work which veered so far from the pictorial.

In each of these periods Picasso worked with a single color or used a color scheme dominated by a single tone and that is why we call them blue and rose and not Picasso’s real art period.

Yeah but you aren’t Picasso and when you paint a boat or a flower or a tree it looks like a boat or a flower or a tree and you don’t need any color tricks to define it. You can paint with color because people will know what you are painting just by looking at it.

Which is a good thing and there’s no excuse for poor draftsmanship, but you can be a great craftsman and still play around with color.

Now I like the trees we have around here. They are actually trees and not the overgrown thorn bushes we call trees in Texas. You have so many kinds that they can be the subject of a whole year’s worth of work and not even begin to cover the vast wealth of foliage that is so generously supplied in Oregon.

But you can also get lost in trees. They have a way of blinding you to the “Big Picture”. Are you doing a portrait of the tree, including it as an element in a landscape or just working one in to add a bit of color to what would be a flat scene?

Do you want the whole tree, or just the leafy part? Maybe you want a bunch of trees and you have to decide where in the bunch you are going to start and where you are going to finish cause if you try to paint the whole stand of trees you are going to need a really big canvas.

When you do decide and start the work do you get what you saw in your mind’s eye or do you get just a bunch of trees hanging around sort of waiting for The Fonz to get there so the party can get started?

Maybe what you need is to simplify the image and make it a monochrome.

I took this on Libby Lane one afternoon. And yes, I did scout the trees for a while so that I knew just what I wanted to include. I took the picture and when I got it home and out of the camera it was just what I wanted, but then the devil whispered in my ear and claimed that I could make a better picture if I sucked all the color out of it.



That worked too, but then that whisper came again and said I should try tinting it with a whole bunch of colors and just see what it does and being able to resist anything, but temptation I gave in.

Most of the spectrum worked. But the one I really liked was the sea foam blue tinted one. 



Okay maybe you don’t, but that just shows to go ya what happens when you start looking at things with a different color filter before your gimlet-eyed, aesthetic, art critic spider sense gets turned up to full.

Okay so it works for trees. But that’s just because they don’t move and there’s no sense of action and they can’t be confused with anything else and that’s why you can cheat and make them into an expressionist still life and get away with it.

So let’s move on to something different.

Now I do wish that I had found another example which didn’t use blue as the underpinning, but the truth is that both of these just looked better with the blue tint.

Found these guys taking a break in Charleston and thought I should preserve them for some future project.





I know nothing about bicycles and biking and don’t really understand why anyone would put on those asphyxiating, torture devices masquerading as shorts, but the folks who do seem to think its okay and even though I get a twinge in my Fruit of the Looms just watching guys trying to pedal when clearly they have no room to maneuver, I’ll just leave them alone and let them do as they like even if they are risking permanent damage due to cutting off the circulation to a vital portion of the human condition, but that’s just my observation and I understand that the Vienna Boys Choir are always on the look out for lead sopranos.

But I captured them and their machines and when I got back to the ole rancho and processed the image it just said you need to tamper with this. You do remember what I said abut temptation?
Right, I did do it and I like what happened and yes it is blue again, but I am sure that it could be rose or gold or even green though why anyone would want a bunch of green men outside of Area 51 is not a subject for this blog, so they’ll just have to stay blue.



Take a look and see what you think. Maybe it will give a jolt to your creative energies and maybe you can come up with a monochrome image all of your own.

Anything that keeps you out of a rut is a good exercise and you don’t want to be just another rutting painter now do you?

Monday, May 27, 2013

Memorial Days

Did you fire up the grill? Maybe you dragged out the old VHS copy of The Guns of Navarone or watched the Longest Day, (the longest movie version which only took three more hours than the Normandy invasion), on TNT? Did you go to the Blessing of the Fleet or the parade downtown? All of these things are good ways to celebrate Memorial Day.

Now in truth more hamburgers have been lost on grills around the country this weekend than at any other time of the year including the Fourth of Julie. People just seem to think that grilling is the way to kick off summer even if the weather is well, Oregon weather. You can actually grill under and umbrella, I’m watching my neighbor do it as we speak and while it looks a little moist I’m sure the folks huddled around the tube will be truly appreciative when the platter comes in.

And yes, I have done my share of outdoor cooking including a whole procession of smoked turkeys when the weather was so cold you had to pull the smoker up close to the house and dash out every so often to check the fire and the water level, but the meat was good and the Long Sufferin was glad that it wasn’t her bending and bowing over the hot stove just to get the bird on that Norman Rockwell table.

So putting on the feed bag is a time honored way to mark the day, but is that the best way to remember those who serve and sacrifice so that we can burn helpless hamburger?

Artists have a lot of privileges. In spite of the fact that all the Congress and most of the media pundits think we are mad, over-sexed, wastrels, slapping paints and claiming to have a greater understanding of universe, we do lead charmed lives. We get to see what not one else can see and when the inspiration is right and the materials are at hand the result can make grown men weak in the knees and that’s when we do landscapes and ships at sea and not just nudes.

So is it fair that we ignore the guys who run to the sound of danger? Not just the men and women of the armed services although this is their holiday but the first responders who fight their own war against the capriciousness of Nature.

The folks who were on the I5 bridge this week sure as hell won’t forget the people who stopped and fished them out of the icy water or what about the people in Oklahoma, (I can feel a pang of sadness for Oakies, even after forty years of hating the Sooners and would not for a moment wish a tornado even on the vile and dastardly scum of Notre Dame.), they sure wanted to see the guys with the emergency equipment throwing caution to the wind and charging in before the storm had completely died.

Why include these guys? Well aside from the fact that they are the real heroes of ordinary life, a disproportionate number of them are returning veterans who learned their skills as a medic or EMT and brought them back so that they could continue serving even after their time in the combat zone was over.

You think all of the valiant are buried in Arlington or guarded at the Tomb of the Unknown? No they work and continue to serve right here in our own area and they do it without so much as a pat on the back or a whispered “well done.”

Where are the images of these guys and why aren’t we artists out there making sure that the rest of the population who doesn’t have the gift of imagery never forgets the people who selflessly serve and die and worse yet get maimed and injured beyond all understanding and then still have to make a life?

Don’t let this Memorial Day pass without committing your talents and skills to making just such an image. Sure there are artists among the returning vets and they do a wonderful job of voicing the suffering and the joys of service. Their art shows produce works of such skill that any other artist ought to think about what they are contributing when they’ve never had to overcome the horrors of war.

And no there is no reason why such an image has to be a Norman Rockwell peace, love and Frisbee in the park sort of Saturday Evening Post Cover, use the gifts you were given.

Maybe it’s the life-saving craft of our own Coast Guard. I look out my window and see the wind and the rain and think how wonderful it is that I’ll be eating diner soon, sitting in my big lounge chair and watching the Stanley Cup. The kids on the Coast Guard will likely be going out to rescue someone who ventured too far from safety and is in desperate trouble and they will do it in weather that I’m not sure I would bring in the trash can in.

What about the invisible Vets, the old, the injured, the homeless? They walk our streets and the best they get from the majority of the people is muttered work of pity or a handful of change and a quick rush away so that we don’t have to think about it too much.

Maybe those are the faces we ought to be making images of? Maybe they could serve to keep us aware that a lot of the people we feel such pity for got that way keeping our ass out of the fire.

Artists have a great responsibility to use their art to make the real issues of life visible for the whole of the People. We can't depend on the Congress, they are too busy trying to hang one another and we can’t depend on a media which makes getting bigger ratings more important than bringing us the news they were tasked to do. We have to look elsewhere. We have to look at ourselves and ask “Are you doing as much as the men and women we claim to honor?”

Memorial Day should be a year long, day in and day out celebration of the service of a handful of Americans. It ain’t just a day.

Sunday, May 26, 2013

Entry Level

When it comes to tools painters have always had a distinct advantage over all other forms of visual art. You need a flat piece of something and a marker of some kind and you are off to the races

The interior decorators of the Lascaux caves used charcoal, roots and a bit of soot and made perfectly brilliant art.

Even when folks had stopped living in caves and had to pay rent the painters among us had it okay, sure they had to skip a lunch or maybe two, but they could get their equipment and still keep a roof over their head. Okay so a five story walk-up garret in the seamier districts of Paris isn’t exactly luxury digs, but it is a roof over the head.

Then along come the photographic process and things start to get a little crazy.

Painters took up arms about the “dabblers” getting artsy with images they just reproduced from nature or captured in a cityscape. They had no real talent just some technical magic.

And in fairness the painters did have a little bit of a point, the early photographs owed much more to living better with chemistry than they ever did to aesthetic sensibility.

But as the process matured and cameras and film became better and more able, the Eye of the photographer became more important than the machinery he carried.

And it is still that way today; wonderful images can be made with any camera if the photographer has the right Eye.

And this boys and girls is a very good thing cause with digital photography now the only process in the game you’d better have a really good Eye cause you’ll never get your hands on top notch equipment. It has been priced out of the hands of ordinary folks.

You have to be Donald Trump or a working professional photographer to buy an “Entry level” digital SLR.

I never owned a Nikon film camera; I always thought they were over-hyped, over-rated and over-priced. They were always good cameras and they did make wonderful images, but you could do the same thing with a camera that wouldn’t equal the gross national product of Costa Rica!

Boy was I naive. Those old Nikons, somewhere around five hundred dollars for a body and maybe three or four hundred more for a lens were too expensive, but their digital cousins have made that look like a cut-rate bargain. I just read an article in Popular Photography about the new Nikon D7100. It is an “entry level” APS-C camera, that means it doesn’t take full-frame images, but uses a small sensor to produce images that are a few pixels smaller and who could tell the difference once they are processed, homogenized and blenmderized through the latest Photoshop, (which costs almost as much as the Volkswagen you went off to college in), so what’s a pixel or two one way or the other?

Okay, let’s talk, to call a camera which does not offer full-frame images and costs one thousand, one hundred, and ninety-five dollars without a lens or fifteen hundred and ninety-five dollars if you want to actually take pictures when you pay your bucks an entry level camera is like saying the stealth bomber is an entry level aircraft which should be available to every citizen, whether they have a pilot’s license or not!

Can you afford that sort of thing cause I can tell you right now I couldn’t and that was before I became an indentured servant to the nice medical folks at Virginia Mason where they drilled a hole through my innards and charged me a ton and a half for the privilege of having a scope run down my gullet and getting drains put in various places where you’d just as soon not know there are places and then I have to travel back every three weeks to check those drains cause there is a very good chance they’ll get stopped up, back up the whole plumbing arrangement, get infected and cause me to bloat up like a puff-adder and have to be Careflighted back to Washington for a redo on the plumbing job and for this painful and expensive job they will carve a gigantic hole in my 401k and tell me it is all in my best interests and this is cheaper than an entry level camera which doesn’t even use a full-frame sensor.

How did we manage to make taking pictures either the app on our phones or a job for the few, the rich, the elite?

This to put it in a word sucks! Yes that was rude and juvenile and lacking in the barest bit of social niceties and not at all the sort of couthie thing a grown up person should be saying, but it ticks me off, cause I don’t think taking a descent picture should be limited to Ipricks or industrial equipment which only those with trust funds can afford.

How the heck did this happen? I used to think Nikons were overpriced, overrated and over-hyped and that was when they could be had for half a thousand bucks. And don’t even get me started on Canons! Now they cost what a mid-sized sedan did in the Sixties and they don’t even come with four doors.

Yes, I do know times have changed and this is a new century and everything costs more and gas is four bucks a gallon and there isn’t a thing I can do about the price-fixing of OPEC, but darnit all there is something I can do about cameras which cost as much as a root canal!

Don’t buy’em. Buy a used camera that is three or four generations behind the curve, but still has so many features Buck Rogers would be confused and he’s from the twenty-fifth century!

Make Canon and Nikon and Sony realize that there are a bunch of folks who use their products to make art and still have to pay the rent, feed the family, slave for doctor’s bills and entry level cannot start at fifteen hundred dollars!


Friday, May 24, 2013

Art Happenings


Show off your talent!
Paintings, collage, photography, sculpture, pottery, fiber, etc....
If you are interested in having your artwork featured as the header for the emailed edition of Art Happenings newsletter,
please send a high quality image (no less than 600px wide x any height) to info@artliaisonconcepts.com.  
In the body of the email include your name, the title of the artwork and the media.
 

Share your art info! 
Announcements, accomplishments, exhibits, classes & workshops, calls to artists....
If you are interested in spreading the word about your event or art venue,
use the submission form at http://artliaisonconcepts.com/art_happenings/ or email info@artliaisonconcepts.com.
Art Happenings is published weekly. Emailed version and printed copies distributed on Fridays.
NEWSLETTER Deadline: Tuesdays 11:59 PST for Friday same week publication.
Editor reserves the right to modify content for layout purposes.

 


This newsletter is funded in part by a grant from the Coos County Cultural Coalition.

Click this link for active .pdf 




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Copyright © 2013 Art Liaison Concepts, LLC, All rights reserved.
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Friday, May 17, 2013

Geology Lecture Sat. 5/18

Hi All-


Dr. Brandon Dugan is in town to talk about giant underwater landslides this Saturday at 7 pm .

This is the last of six talks in the geo lecture series this year. For more info, see below:

The Geology Lecture Series concludes for this academic year on Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 7:00 pm with "Origin, Evolution, and Impacts of Large Submarine Landslides" by Dr. Brandon Dugan. The free lecture is at the Hales Center for the Performing Arts on the SWOCC campus and is open to all members of the community. Dr. Dugan received his BS from the University of Minnesota and PhD from Penn State . He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth Science at Rice University . As a hydrogeologist, he couples theory, experiments and models to understand the interactions of fluids and solids in shallow, subsurface flows. Dr. Dugan has participated in multiple Integrated Ocean Drilling Program expeditions as a shore-based scientist, shipboard scientist and co-chief scientist. Dr. Dugan’s talk is part of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership Distinguished Lecturer Presentations.
Dr. Dugan will also be providing an informal talk on Friday afternoon, May 17th at 3:30 pm for students that are interested in pursuing careers in the sciences when he discusses "Exploring the Earth: A Job that Takes You on Vacation". The talk will focus on his research with the Ocean Drilling Program, classes students should take when preparing for scientific careers and the opportunity to ask questions in an informal setting. The free Friday afternoon session will take place in Coaledo Hall Room 7-the geology lab. All of the talks are free and start at 7:00 pm in the Hales Center for the Performing Arts on the SWOCC Campus. Continuing sponsors of the lecture series include Oregon Resources Corporation, the SWOCC Foundation and the College. The first talk next year will be co-sponsored with OIMB when we will host Dr. Deborah Kelley ( University of Washington ) on Friday, October 11th. For additional information contact Ron Metzger at 541-888-7216.

Reminder about miniature art drop-off dates at Art by the Sea :

Reminder: Art Delivery for the Miniature and Small Works Show is May 25 - 29 from 11-5 PM daily.


Bring in your 1—3 pieces of art work with paperwork and entry fee to Art by The Sea Gallery & Studio in the Continuum Building,

175 2nd St. SE, Suite C , Bandon, OR 97411.

Entry forms are available at the gallery.

Call 541-347-5355 with questions.





Art Happenings


Show off your talent!

Paintings, collage, photography, sculpture, pottery, fiber, etc....

If you are interested in having your artwork featured as the header for the emailed edition of Art Happenings newsletter,

please send a high quality image (no less than 600px wide x any height) to info@artliaisonconcepts.com.

In the body of the email include your name, the title of the artwork and the media.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Share your art info!

Announcements, accomplishments, exhibits, classes & workshops, calls to artists....

If you are interested in spreading the word about your event or art venue,

use the submission form at http://artliaisonconcepts.com/art_happenings/ or email info@artliaisonconcepts.com.

Art Happenings is published weekly. Emailed version and printed copies distributed on Fridays.

NEWSLETTER Deadline: Tuesdays 11:59 PST for Friday same week publication.

Editor reserves the right to modify content for layout purposes.

------------------------------------------------------

This newsletter is funded in part by a grant from the Coos County Cultural Coalition.

Click this link for active .pdf





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Saturday, May 11, 2013

Meanwhile Back At The Ranch

For those of you who have been following the ongoing soap opera of my medical maladies, I am off to Seattle for the second half of my cure.

Three weeks ago I went to Eugene to consult with a gastroenterologist. He did an ERCP which is medical for stuffing a tube down my throat and playing peek-a-boo with my pancreas.

The results were both encouraging and depressing, they ruled out cancer but the debris left in the cyst was so extensive that they couldn’t do anything about it. The doctor, good guy and very on top of his game, assured me that if he inserted a stint the debris would just clog it in a matter of days and I’d be no better off than I am now. He was able to put a stint in my bile duct so that my liver could begin to function normally and the reports from friends and family indicate that this was a success. (I stopped turning yellow and they tell me this is an improvement. Didn’t do much for the terrible itching but I have hopes that once the cyst is dealt with they can do more for the liver.)

The depressing part was that the only folks competent to do a more extensive gut excavation are the nice people at Virginia Mason in Seattle. So that’s where I’m headed. They will again play peek-a-boo and then put in a large drain so that I can be rid of the cyst. How long and how complex this will be can’t be determined until they get in and get a look.

So I will work at maintaining the blog, but there my be even longer periods of inactivity coming. This isn’t because I’ve lost interest in your art and your successes but because it is hard to gather news with a tube down your throat.

I’ll let you know when I get back how successful and how much more they have found that they need to do. (This is like using a contractor, you know that the estimate is just a guideline and that as soon as they have the flooring torn up and the sink pulled out of the wall they will discover a flange or a strut which has to be replaced and in order to get at it they will have to disassemble the foundation, but that will only take another year and a half and what’s so bad about living in a place where the roof leaks, the plumbing doesn’t work and there are guys with number thirteen work boots marching through day and night?)

I’ll see you next week with more news.

Art Happenings


Show off your talent!
Paintings, collage, photography, sculpture, pottery, fiber, etc....
If you are interested in having your artwork featured as the header for the emailed edition of Art Happenings newsletter,
please send a high quality image (no less than 600px wide x any height) to info@artliaisonconcepts.com
In the body of the email include your name, the title of the artwork and the media.

 

Share your art info!
Announcements, accomplishments, exhibits, classes & workshops, calls to artists....
If you are interested in spreading the word about your event or art venue,
use the submission form at http://artliaisonconcepts.com/art_happenings/ or email info@artliaisonconcepts.com.
Art Happenings is published weekly. Emailed version and printed copies distributed on Fridays.
NEWSLETTER Deadline: Tuesdays 11:59 PST for Friday same week publication.
Editor reserves the right to modify content for layout purposes.

 


This newsletter is funded in part by a grant from the Coos County Cultural Coalition.

Click this link for active .pdf 




 Click image for larger view


Copyright © 2013 Art Liaison Concepts, LLC, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you subscribed to Ava Richey's art newsletter titled "Art Happenings", you signed up via the Art Liaison Concepts, LLC website, or you signed up via the MailChimp subscription form. If you have received this email in error, click the Unsubscribe link provided within this email.
Our mailing address is:
Art Liaison Concepts, LLC
PO Box 643
Coquille, OR 97423

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Thursday, May 9, 2013

Telling Stories With Collage

If you haven't had a chance to look, Donna Cox, dorothea tortilla and Susan Lehman have a collage show is in the Bandon Library cases for the month of May! : ) Some works have been borrowed for this show, but most are for sale by contacting the artists.












ASMA's 15th Annual National Maritime Exhibition

May 18th is the close of the 15th Annual National Maritime Exhibition. This means that there are only eight days to see this spectacular show. We also have a fantastic catalog of all of the artwork presented in this show. This catalog is only $17.00 for members and $20.00 for non-members. We are open Tuesday through Saturday, 10:00am to 4:00pm.

The next exhibition will be Expressions West, opening May 31st.

And the next exhibition will be our 20th Annual Maritime/Plein Air Dinner and Fundraiser, opening August 3rd, with a Wine Walk preview August 2nd. This event will benefit Coos Art Museum.

We are having a very exciting year and hope you will stop by Coos Art Museum.

Author Talk

Author talks and book signings!

Saturday May 11th at 1p.m.


Carolyn Whitney Prola has compiled excerpts from her father’s writings and oral interviews into a new book called In the Shadow of Sugarloaf. She will share first-hand accounts collected from her father, George H. Whitney, of what it was like to grow up in rural areas of Coos County from 1910 to about 1930. Listen as Carolyn talks about ranch life, school days, holidays, and a time when boat traffic was the main form of transportation.

Thursday May 15th at 7:30 p.m.



'ROUGH RIDER' RIDES AGAIN!

“President Theodore Roosevelt” is coming to town! Nationally-known performer Joe Wiegand will appear for a single evening, May 15th at 7:30 p.m. at the Hales Center at Southwestern Oregon Community College. All proceeds benefit the Coos Historical & Maritime Museum.

Wiegand performed at the White House for “TR”’s 150th birthday. His thoroughly convincing roadshow amazingly recreates the "Rough Rider" President in appearance, mannerisms and flamboyant speaking style.

Roosevelt was the first president to face many of our modern problems, including the balance of corporate power, organized labor and individual rights. This unforgettable event will stimulate your brain and your imagination, and trigger lively discussions.

The “Roosevelt Show” is supported by a generous grant from Wells Fargo and the Oregon Historical Society. Admission is $10 at the door, and $3 for children 12 and under; $8 in advance and for members of the Coos County Historical Society. For more information, please call the Coos Historical & Maritime Museum at 541-756-6320, or visit www.cooshistory.org.

Sunday, May 5, 2013

Call to Digital Artists, Photographers and Print Malers

Pacific Park Gallery

1957 Thompson Rd.,

Coos Bay, Oregon

Located inside the Pacific Coast Medical Park


Call to Digital Artists, Photographers and Print Makers
2013-14

Entry Deadline: Open and ongoing




About the Gallery

The Pacific Park Gallery strives to encourage innovative artists. The gallery consists of three exhibit spaces: The Atrium, The Salon and The Mezzanine. The Atrium is for free-standing sculpture, textiles, installations, and large wall art. The Salon is a long wide hallway featuring wall art. The Mezzanine is reserved for smaller work, such as hand-pulled prints, encaustics and photography.

Exhibits will hang for three-months beginning in July, 2013 (July-September 2013, October-December 2013, January-March 2014, April-June 2014,) and feature no more than two artists in each exhibit space. This call will fill all show spaces through June, 2014.

Eligibility: There are no regional residential limits. All work must be the original work of the artist and completed within 5 years of the exhibit.

Size and Installation: There are no size limitations for the Mezzanine exhibit space. Work must be ready to hang with appropriate gallery hanging/mounting hardware, including wrapped wire and preferably D-ring hangers. Weight restrictions may apply.

Sales policy: The gallery is unmanned, although secure and insured. Sales are non-commission, handled directly through the artist and are the responsibility of the exhibiting artist or their representative. The gallery is open during business hours (7:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday) and viewing traffic is about 100 per day, plus special event traffic. You are not required to gallery sit.

Deadlines: Submissions will be accepted until the exhibit calendar for July 2013-June 2014 is filled. Hanging dates will vary according to an annual schedule and the artist’s availability.

Juroring: The Gallery jury includes Paula Reis, photographer, Pat Snyder, printmaker/painter, Susan Lehman, mixed media/textile, and Janne LaValle, mixed media.

Submission: The Mezzanine space is large and chosen artists will be asked to hang 10 to 20 pieces for their show. Entry CDs should strive to reflect the artist’s body of work and need not present every image to be exhibited. Send a CD with 5 – 10 images of work with image list, completed entry form, and an entry check for $30 payable to Pacific Park Gallery, to Pacific Park Gallery, P.O. Box 635, Lakeside, Oregon 97449. CDs must be clearly labeled with artist’s name.

Questions: For clarifications or further information: artistjanuary@gmail.com





Name:___________________________________________________________



Address:________________________________________________________


Email Address:________________________________________________________



Phone # ________________________________________________________________



Media/Medium ________________________________________________________________


What do you hope to achieve as an artist?




Please include a brief bio.

Workshop

CAM / Expressions West Opening weekend



Hi Expressions West Artists;


A change of plans and a reminder that the opening of Expressions West 2013 is on May 31, 2013.

Juror, John Hewitt was going to conduct a review and discussion of this year’s Expressions West but now he is doing a plein air workshop on June 1, 2, & 3, 2013 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

John Hewitt Workshop

Dates: Saturday, Sunday, & Monday - June 1, 2, & 3, 2013

Time: 10:00 am to 4:00 pm

HIGH SCHOOL AND ADULT STUDENTS

This will be a plein air workshop, weather permitting. Free yourself from the tyranny of detail. Learn to design a work of art, not just a reproduction of a scene, photographs do that better. Use the elements and principles of design developed over hundreds of years by the great masters to assist you in painting your own image. Learn to express YOUR personal view of the world around you, not just a copy of what you see. Learn to discover what speaks to you and why. What are you trying to say in your work? Unfortunately, first you must master the technique and in watercolor that is no small task. It can be learned in a few easy steps that can be practiced until they are second nature. We will cover these steps in the first hour. We will paint a new scene each day with commentary on what we are trying to say and how we say it. Subjects covered will be water, sand, driftwood, rocks, buildings, clouds, grasses, etc. A technique for each will be explored and an explanation for choice of paint, paper and brushes will be given. You will be guided toward your own preference of style, not the teacher’s style.

“I have been a student of the greatest watercolorists of the 20th century. My goal is to pass on this legacy to the 21st century. Come join us and have a great time becoming a successful plein air artist. You will receive encouragement, not criticism.”

12 STUDENTS MAX. CLASS FEE: $195 MEMBERS; $220 NON-MEMBERS

Friday, May 3, 2013

Art Happenings




Show off your talent!
Paintings, collage, photography, sculpture, pottery, fiber, etc....
If you are interested in having your artwork featured as the header for the emailed edition of Art Happenings newsletter,
please send a high quality image (no less than 600px wide x any height) to info@artliaisonconcepts.com.
In the body of the email include your name, the title of the artwork and the media.

 

Share your art info!
Announcements, accomplishments, exhibits, classes & workshops, calls to artists....
If you are interested in spreading the word about your event or art venue,
use the submission form at http://artliaisonconcepts.com/art_happenings/ or email info@artliaisonconcepts.com.
Art Happenings is published weekly. Emailed version and printed copies distributed on Fridays.
NEWSLETTER Deadline: Tuesdays 11:59 PST for Friday same week publication.
Editor reserves the right to modify content for layout purposes.



This newsletter is funded in part by a grant from the Coos County Cultural Coalition.


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